Remember Your Death, And Have Some Candy

“Mom! I want to drive by the SCARY DRAGON!!” my daughter yells, emphasizing the words, “scary” and “dragon” with a growl from the backseat.

Our neighborhood has been getting prepared for Halloween with skeleton decorations, orange lights, and lawn inflatables (i.e. “scary dragons”). Thankfully, most people around us are keeping it pretty kid-friendly, and I haven’t yet had attempt to explain any front-yard execution scenes. (On a related note: Sometimes I think Halloween might be a pretty good time for law enforcement to take a walk around some neighborhood “decorations” and update their watch-lists…just sayin’.)

Halloween isn’t my *favorite*, but I don’t have anything against it, per se. I used to not like the “scary” element to it…why can’t things just be nice and happy? And maybe it’s just all this memento mori: remember your death,” talk in the Catholic blogosphere lately, but I’m becoming less averse to the graveyard scenes and skeleton décor as of late.

I’ve always known that Halloween is a Christian-friendly holiday (holy-day!). It’s All-Hallows’ Eve, the eve of All Saints’ Day, and the kick-start to the three days in which we are supposed to remember, pray, and offer sacrifice for all those who have gone before us. As Christians, we should always be mindful that we will one day meet the end of this life on earth. We will all experience death. Thanks to Christ, death does not have the final say, but that does not make death any less serious of a matter.

Where Halloween gets weird for me is when we jump from, “Death is scary!” to, “Death is fun!” That sort of perverted obsession or glorification of death, and making Halloween a time of “playing around” with evil gets a big NOPE from me.

To me, Halloween only makes sense as a fun holiday because Christ came to conquer death. Without Christ, Halloween is just a day that says, “Hey everyone! Look at all the evil in the world! And one day- we’re going to DIE!” Sounds terrible.

With Christ, we know that sin (evil) and death do not have the final say. So yeah, that skeleton looks creepy, but Christ conquered it. Yeah, that monster is ugly, but it’s evil is powerless over me, because I belong to Christ. Now give me some candy.

So while I don’t think I’ll ever swap my seasonal pumpkins and autumn foliage decor for ghosts and skeletons, as a Christian I can actually somewhat appreciate the graveyard displays and skeletal reminders of our mortality that this time of year brings with it. And if you want to give my kids and me candy while we’re at it, well hey, no complaints here.